WisDOT radio newsline audio

​​​Newsline audio releases—July 21, 2017

Listed below are MP3 audio files and the text of actualities and wraps associated with Wisconsin DOT's Radio Newsline. 

Wrong-way drivers are a serious hazard on our roadways. Wisconsin State Patrol Sergeant David Harvey discusses what motorists should do if suddenly confronted with a wrong-way driver…

Cut 1Dave Harvey, Wisconsin State Patrol (138 KB/17 seconds)

“It’s always a good idea to scan the highway ahead for possible problems. If you see a wrong-way driver headed toward you, you’ll most often want to move to the right and slow down. Once you’ve avoided danger, pull over, call 911 and provide as much detailed information as possible.”

Cut 2: Dave Harvey, Wisconsin State Patrol (135 KB/16 seconds)

“Wrong-way drivers are often disoriented or impaired, and unaware they’re going the wrong way – so they’ll often bear to their right as they would on a two-lane highway. This puts them in your left or passing lane. So that’s why you generally want to move to your right as soon as you can.”

Cut 3: Harvey wrap (440 KB/55 seconds)

If you’re travelling on the Interstate or other multi-lane freeway, would you know what to do if suddenly confronted with a wrong-way driver? This is Wisconsin State Patrol Sergeant David Harvey…

“It’s always a good idea to scan the highway ahead for possible problems. If you see a wrong-way driver headed toward you, you’ll most often want to move to the right and slow down. Once you’ve avoided danger, pull over, call 911 and provide as much detailed information as possible.”

Wrong-way drivers are often impaired and unaware they’re traveling the wrong way. Sergeant Harvey says they will typically bear to their right as they would in two-way traffic – putting them in your passing lane… “As a general rule, it’s a good idea to stay on the right on a freeway so the left lane is available for passing, unless you need to make room for merging vehicles or as you pass vehicles stopped on the shoulder.”  This is Rob Miller reporting.

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So far this year, 36 pedestrians and one bicyclist have lost their lives in traffic-related crashes in Wisconsin. Larry Corsi (core-see) with the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety says people biking, walking and driving motor vehicles all play a role in safe travel…

Cut 1: Larry Corsi, Wisconsin DOT (177 KB/21 seconds)

“When we talk about safety among bicyclists, pedestrians and motorists, it really requires everyone to do their part and share the road. If you’re driving a motor vehicle - keep a close eye out for bikers and for people walking. Be especially careful at intersections and when turning. Bikers need to obey the same traffic rules as motorists. Pedestrians should always use crosswalks, and make sure drivers see you before you step into the roadway.”

Cut 2: Larry Corsi, Wisconsin DOT (136 KB/16 seconds)

“We’re especially concerned about children. When they’re out there walking or biking, too often they’re not thinking about safety. Common problems we see with young bikers and pedestrians: they’re easily distracted, they often under-estimate the speed of oncoming traffic, and their smaller size can make them harder for motorists to see.”

Cut 3Corsi wrap (547 KB/55 seconds)

Traffic-related crashes in Wisconsin last year resulted in the deaths of 49 pedestrians, 11 bicyclists and injured another 2,000 people who were walking or biking. Larry Corsi with the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety says those numbers are a sobering reminder that all travelers - bicyclists, pedestrians and motorists - need to share the road, pay attention and obey traffic laws…

“When we talk about safety among bicyclists, pedestrians and motorists, it really requires everyone to do their part and share the road. If you’re driving a motor vehicle - keep a close eye out for bikers and for people walking. Be especially careful at intersections and when turning. Bikers need to obey the same traffic rules as motorists. Pedestrians should always use crosswalks, and make sure drivers see you before you step into the roadway.”

The Wisconsin DOT sponsors community workshops focused on bike and pedestrian safety, and suggests parents talk with children to emphasize safety on and along roadways. So far this year, 36 pedestrians and one bicyclist have died in traffic-related crashes in Wisconsin. This is Rob Miller reporting.

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